Hawaii’s One Woman Band – I am Kawehi

I_am_Kawehi

This is NOT apart of the Hawaii girls and women athletic community but it’s definitely amongst the Hawaii women awe-spiring talents!  This was a must share because of the empowering message – Dreams do come true and anything is possible so long you put the work in! To learn more about Kawehi, you can visit her website – I AM KAWEHI 

WSF’s – 10 MUSTS for Parents and Coaches of Girl Athletes

Hawaii_Girls_SportsPHOTO COURTESY: CAKEKNIFEPHOTOGRAPHY.COM

1.   Sport must be fun.

  • We enjoy success but we don’t enjoy striking out three times in a row. Skill is very important to the realization of fun.
  • We enjoy learning new things but we don’t enjoy boredom.
  • We enjoy respect but we don’t enjoy terror, threats and negatives.

2. Keep competition in perspective. Educating your child is key.

  • Only put your child in competitive situations with evenly matched opponents.
  • Separate performance from self-worth.
  • Better to lose and do your personal best than win and play ugly.
  • Better to lose to a good opponent and learn what you need to do to get better than to win against someone who can’t play and learning nothing new.

3. Skill is a function of repetition and a key to having fun.

  • Kids learn/teach themselves.
  • Good teachers help.
  • Imitation is an important learning method —  take your child to see others play.

4.  Help your child find a sport that is just right for her.

  • Commit to a certain time period
  • Commit to skill-learning before you give up.
  •  Make the deal before you play

5.  You can and should coach your child.

  • It’s not hard to be better than a six-year-old
  • It’s n ot hard to teach.

6.  Lead by example as a spectator and as a cheerleader.

  • Be positive toward your child.
  • Be positive to all other children and their parents.

7.  Deliver value messages over and over again. They will sink in!

 

  • ”It’s important how you play the game.”
  • ”How you play says something about who you are. If you cheat, you are dishonest. If you argue about calls, you are a whiner.”
  • Deliver messages in a non-judgmental, matter of fact way with no anger evident.

8. There are many ways you can encourage your child to participate in sport without forcing it.

  • Take them with you when you play…they want to be like you.
  • Make play fun.
  • Take them to watch others play. Buy books about sport.
  • Give gifts that say “I think you can do it!”

9. Get involved in their sport experience.

  • Join your child’s league governance, etc.
  • Make sure coaches and officials are certified and educated.

10. Select coaches who you respect, admire and trust.

 

  • Do not tolerate bad people…no matter how many games your child’s team wins.
  • Make sure the team your child plays on has children of similar skill.

4 Short & Sweet Life Lessons for Hawaii Women with Jennifer Lawrence

4 lifes lessons we feel is empowering messages for our Hawaii Women Athletes! Why Jennifer Lawrence? Because she’s a #kickass girl who thinks Hawaii is AMAZING, then again who doesn’t? – Moreover, she has a complete RAWNESS with her interviews where you know, you can totally relate!

#1. Be you and Embrace it! You look how you look! “Be comfortable. What are you going to do? Be hungry every single day to make other people happy? That’s just dumb.” – Video with Yahoo! 

#2. Make friends, not enemies! Good Morning America Video  “Why can’t we just be nice?” “It’s like, we grow up, and then we get right back into high school.

#3. Acknowlegde your strengths no matter how small or awkward! LOL - Rolling Stones 2012 “I’m the fastest pee-er ever, “I’m famous for it.”

#4. Eating is healthy! 2012 Cover Story on Elle “I’m never going to starve myself for a part,” “I don’t want little girls to be like, ‘Oh, I want to look like Katniss, so I’m going to skip dinner.’ That’s something I was really conscious of during training, when you’re trying to get your body to look exactly right. I was trying to get my body to look fit and strong—not thin and underfed.”

Jennifer Lawrence work and play in Hawaii: Hunger Games – Catching Fire

How Exactly Is a Girl Empowered by Sport?

Photo By: Boysie Koga

Photo By: Boysie Koga

Six hundred million girls are growing up in developing countries today. International authorities, from the World Bank to the United Nations, agree that the most effective way to fight poverty in the world is to help girls and women. Sport has been increasingly respected as a valuable tool for empowering youth in developing countries. However, opportunities to participate in sport for development programs are often designed for, and dominated by boys and men as opposed to girls.

When provided with the opportunity, we know that girls can significantly benefit from the economic, emotional and physical self-determination that an intentionally-crafted sport for development program can offer. It can be an accelerator to her actualizing her full potential.

If you’ve participated in sport, you probably understand this proposition implicitly. The way we like to frame the change we see in girls through sport is through our “Three As” Theory of change. Through a well-designed sport program, a girl can gain assets, access and agency.

Building Assets
Sport builds three main assets: social, human and sport skills. When a girl has the opportunity to develop these areas, she can create social networks, build mental and emotional health, become educated about her rights, and develop tactical and technical sport skills – not to mention physical strength. These assets are the building blocks to more confidence and, for many, the first steps up and out.

Providing Access to Resources
Community and institutional resources are often limited for girls. Well-designed sport programs can serve as a way “in” to gaining much-needed support. They can help link girls to health, education, and other critical sectors as well as provide access to powerful and important information for their healthy development. Sport programs can also provide girls with access to mentors, strong female role models and the social support of a team or group of peers.

Developing Agency
Agency is the ability of a girl to act in her own self-interest. Sport gives girls the opportunity to develop self-determination in a safe environment. In a sport program, girls have an opportunity to become leaders, to witness and be applauded for their own progress, and to use their voices. This can increase girls’ belief in their own abilities. This translates into everyday life – it encourages them to take initiatives and attempt things they never assumed possible. Building agency for one girl doesn’t just help her, it also helps those around her. As she begins to exercise her muscles of leadership, she becomes an increasingly valuable contributor to her family, her program and her greater community.

At Women Win, we base our global strategy on this theory of change because we know it works. As girls build assets, gain access to critical resources and advance their agency, we believe they have the opportunity to grow into the (s)heroes they were born to be.

17 year old Calera Uchigakiuchi Schlesinger: Empowering Girls to Change the World.

Empowerment stories inspire action and Stepping up to the heroic action is 17 year old Student Athlete, Calera Uchigakiuchi Schlesinger of Sacred Hearts Academy: Empowering Girls to Change the World.

Calera Uchigakiuchi Schlesinger

Calera Uchigakiuchi Schlesinger

Cal of Mongolian descent, adopted at 22 months by successful plastic surgeon, Larry Schlesinger and Arlene Uchigakiuchi, studies Shoto-kan karate (brown belt) under Sensei George Kotaka: WKF World Champion 2008, MMA and Boxing under trainer Jon Shimokawa and swims under instructor, Don Pump.

Cal's Aloha Recipes: A Teenagers Family Cookbook

Cal’s heroic action entwines her artistic abilities and love for cooking -  Her very 1st business/charity venture publication – “Cal’s Aloha Recipes – A Teenager’s Family Cookbook.” She will be donating 100% of all proceeds to the Sacred Hearts Scholarship Fund Gala and Silent Auction on October 18. These scholarships benefit the 24% of Sacred Hearts students receiving financial aid.

I am thrilled that I get the opportunity to assist in endowing this scholarship.  Moreover I am honored to have this opportunity to combine my love of cooking, some of my artwork, and a truly deep seated gratitude and affection for Ms. Gopaul (book dedication) and Sacred Hearts Academy… I would like to encourage all the younger students to take a moment and realize what a great center of learning we all attend , and also realize how lucky we all are because of the care and love we each receive every day from the teachers, counselors and administration.   

Calera Schlesinger

Strong is pretty, and Olympics are proof

Fully 40 years after the passage of Title IX of our nation’s Civil Rights Act, female athletes have come into their own. The chalk dust is still settling from this year’s Olympic Games, and the ink is still drying on astounding new Olympic and world records. But before the Games fade into history, let the record show that among world-class athletes, this was the Year of the Woman.

Although much remains to be done to advance women in Olympic competition, the International Olympic Committee showed what could happen if change becomes not an evolutionary but an intentional part of the larger work of advancing excellence in sports. For the first time, every nation participating in the Games had a woman on its team, even the previously unthinkable: a woman in the judo competition representing Saudi Arabia.

U.S. commentators observed that, had they been counted as a separate country, the American women who won medals would have ranked third in total medal count among nations. Women represented the majority on Team USA for the first time. Of our nation’s 46 gold medals, 63 percent were won by women – another first. Their performances captivated Americans and captured the hearts of millions of teen girls; viewership of the Olympics by teenage American girls was up a whopping 54 percent. It is no wonder, given the performances by the likes of Claressa Shields, Gabby DouglasAly RaismanMissy FranklinCarmelita Jeter and three-time gold medalists Misty May-Treanor and Kerri Walsh.

They gave us medals, and they gave us role models.

Word spread during the Olympics that “strong is the new pretty.” We can only hope this new adage will stick – and become at least a partial antidote to the manufactured images of women and girls served up by the popular media as the feminine ideal.

But we can’t rest here. Women were still objectified during this year’s games. After a year of strong performances culminated in a fourth-place finish in London, Lolo Jones grieved over being verbally shredded about her appearance. And for Douglas, the strong young gymnast whose skills matched her shining smile, her history-making gold medal performances shared headlines with unnecessary judgments about her hair.

Instead of irrelevant criticism, let’s focus on performance.

Let’s also focus on encouraging and enabling all women and girls to participate in sports; there is still much work to be done. Women and girls still face major barriers to access, including lack of opportunities and conflicting messages in society about whether they should participate, what they should look like, who they should “be.”

By age 14, girls drop out of sports at twice the rate of boys. Lack of access to sport is a drop-out driver because, in spite of Title IX, which bans sex discrimination in academics and sports, there are still 1.3 million fewer opportunities for girls to participate in high school sports (60,000 fewer in college). Girls often struggle to find a spot on a team, especially in underserved communities where cultural and economic barriers make female participation in sports even more challenging.

Complicating all this are the persistent messages girls receive on the importance of being “Hollywood thin” rather than emulating strong, athletic role models like the ones who medaled in London – or like Geena Davis, the Hollywood star who was an Olympic archery candidate.

Why does it matter? Why do female athletes excelling in Olympic competition make a difference for young women and girls? In the United States it is estimated that 80 percent of our female executives participated actively in sports earlier in their lives. Sports, at its best, is a metaphor for life and a teaching ground for teamwork, leadership, coping with winning and losing, and pursuing one’s personal best.

For women, it is about this and more: a way for women to develop their strength and their power, both literally and figuratively. In this 40th anniversary year of Title IX, let us remember those leaders who fought to pass that legislation, let institutions take seriously the letter of the law, and let us translate its values into women’s sports as an example to the world.

World champion boxer Laila A. Ali is president and Kathryn E. Olson is CEO of the Women’s Sports Foundation.

Read more: http://www.sfgate.com/opinion/openforum/article/Strong-is-pretty-and-Olympics-are-proof-3794627.php#ixzz25xUkkxRE

10 Commandments for Parents and Coaches of Girls

As coaches and parents, we bring our values to sport and transmit them to our children and their teammates. Remembering these 10 Commandments will help you and your child have the best experience in sports as possible.

2012 WEST REGION CHAMPION MAKAKILO KAPOLEI HONOLEI HALE LITTLE LEAGUE, KAPOLEI, HAWAII

1.   Sport must be fun.

  • We enjoy success but we don’t enjoy striking out three times in a row. Skill is very important to the realization of fun.
  • We enjoy learning new things but we don’t enjoy boredom.
  • We enjoy respect but we don’t enjoy terror, threats and negatives.

2.  Keep competition in perspective. Educating your child is key.

  • Only put your child in competitive situations with evenly matched opponents. S
  • S eparate performance from self-worth.
  • Better to lose and do your personal best than win and play ugly.
  • Better to lose to a good opponent and learn what you need to do to get better than to win against someone who can’t play and learning nothing new.

3.  Skill is a function of repetition and a key to having fun.

  • Kids learn/teach themselves.
  • Good teachers help.
  • Imitation is an important learning method —  take your child to see others play.

4.  Help your child find a sport that is just right for her.

  • Commit to a certain time period
  • Commit to skill-learning before you give up.
  • Make the deal before you play

5.  You can and should coach your child.

  • It’s not hard to be better than a six-year-old
  • It’s n ot hard to teach.

6.  Lead by example as a spectator and as a cheerleader.

  • Be positive toward your child.
  • Be positive to all other children and their parents.

7.  Deliver value messages over and over again. They will sink in!

  • ”It’s important how you play the game.”
  • ”How you play says something about who you are. If you cheat, you are dishonest. If you argue about calls, you are a whiner.”
  • Deliver messages in a non-judgmental, matter of fact way with no anger evident.

8.  There are many ways you can encourage your child to participate in sport without forcing it.

  • Take them with you when you play…they want to be like you.
  • Make play fun.
  • Take them to watch others play. Buy books about sport.
  • Give gifts that say “I think you can do it!”

9.  Get involved in their sport experience.

  • Join your child’s league governance, etc.
  • Make sure coaches and officials are certified and educated.

10.  Select coaches who you respect, admire and trust.

  • Do not tolerate bad people…no matter how many games your child’s team wins.
  • Make sure the team your child plays on has children of similar skill.

Sharing Your Daughter’s Passion

Society tends to define young girls by their activities, such as: She is an equestrian, a softball player, or a gymnast. You should make sure your daughter has something positive in her life by which her friends and community can define her. Ask her what her passion is and help her explore it more deeply. Often that passion revolves around a sport she is drawn to. You can use this activity to teach her more self-control and patience.

You model self-discipline by the way you act, and you foster your daughter’s self-discipline and control by her involvement in something that demands:

  • Practicing a skill for a long time, such as playing golf or tennis
  • Working on a long-range project, such as building a piece of furniture
  • Investing much of her time and money in something, such as starting a collection

You can also watch what natural athletic talent your daughter may have and build on the passion she feels for the sport. You can coach her, or by following your own passion, guide your girl into rooting for your favorite teams, or get her to imitate your own sports prowess. She may end up loving something you excelled in or take the sport to a whole new level. You should always include both your boys and girls in the sports training you provide and the sports equipment you install in your backyard. In fact, you should make no distinction between how much time you devote to your son’s little league games and your daughter’s track meets. Also give your daughter more “masculine” presents, such as a baseball mitt or a chemistry set.

You can teach your daughter many valuable life lessons through sports. For example, how not to take tryouts too seriously, how to be a good winner and a good loser, and how to throw herself into a pursuit she loves just for the sake of it. Hobbies can also bind fathers and daughters.

Sharing Hobbies

Most of all, share an interest that allows you and your daughter to keep up with each other and with your lives over time. There is always an occasion to talk during a fishing trip — at least during the drive to the lake and back home — or a camping excursion. Traveling together, by bike, boat, car, on foot, or via “arm-chair” can also nurture your father-daughter connection. During those travels, you and your girl will have many chances to solve problems. You can teach your daughter how to create something out of nothing, or how to make the best out of any situation, no matter how bad. One example is calling a flat tire an opportunity for adventure. Documenting your travels and putting them on a CD, rehashing your trips and creating a blog, or videotaping your visits to the zoo or the planetarium will give her many precious memories.

Sharing Hopes

Spending an evening with you gazing at the stars will nurture your girl’s sense of awe. As you explain your view of the universe, and your hopes and dreams for her, she will feel free to tell you of her hopes and dreams while developing an allegiance to something greater: humankind’s universal striving to be the best. Things worth doing and realizing one’s dreams can take a lot of time and work, but each step along the way, you can help your daughter soar.

by: Erika V. Shearin Karres, Ed.D.

Girls in Sports – The Many Benefits of Team Sports For Young Women

By: Darla Blackman

557056_289395347801693_2087638674_n_0Though long espoused as crucial for the development of young men, involvement in sports is highly beneficial for girls as well. Young women involved in sports are more likely to achieve academically, have increased self-esteem, experience a higher level of health and wellness, learn crucial skills for entering a competitive workforce, and enjoy the social rewards that accompany working as a team and having fun with others. With the availability of girls’ sports increasing, it is important that young women be encouraged to participate and enjoy the higher quality of life that sports help them achieve.

The most obvious benefit of involvement in sports is a healthier body. All children involved in athletics experience a decrease in the likelihood of developing obesity, diabetes, heart disease, and several other complications linked to a sedentary lifestyle. For young women, in particular, there is a strong correlation between adequate exercise and a decreased risk for breast cancer and osteoporosis, both diseases that typically affect women. Studies also reveal that girls involved in extracurricular activities are less likely to experience an unwanted pregnancy. Being physically active when young increases the likelihood that a person will live an active lifestyle as an adult.

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Studies indicate that young people who are involved in athletic activities achieve higher grades and are more likely to complete high school and college. This may be because adequate exercise improves mental acuity. It may also be attributed to the fact that children in sports are less likely to abuse illegal substances, such as drugs and alcohol. Steering clear of these substances helps young people stay focused on their academics and free of dangerous distractions. There is also evidence that young people who play sports are less likely to start smoking.

Women who are physically active generally have higher self esteem. They experience a better body image than their sedentary peers and exhibit more confidence. They are also less likely to develop symptoms of depression. The feeling of accomplishment that athletics can garner, having a healthy body, and feeling strong and capable all help young women feel good about themselves and experience a higher quality of life.

As more women enter the workforce, there are many job skills they can acquire from participation in competitive sports. Young women can learn to work as a team, to value a person’s skills and abilities, to take orders from a captain or supervisor, and acquire the confidence in their abilities necessary to success in a competitive job market.

In addition to all the quantifiable and tangible benefits of sports participation for young women, there is also the immeasurable social reward. Sports offer girls an opportunity to socialize with people of varying abilities and experiences. Through sports, young women can find positive role models. They can learn the importance of working hard, working together, and being fair. Athletics offer children a myriad of social interaction and the delight that comes with playing a game and having fun.

With all the benefits of participating in sports for young girls, it is important to provide opportunity and encouragement to all young women to compete and play. Athletics and competition are an integral part of any child’s growth and development, and young women are certainly no exception.

Women and sports: Where we go from here

The relationship between women and sports seems like it should be simple. Sports involve the use of our bodies; women have bodies; therefore, women and sports should naturally relate.

But like many relationships, this one is more complicated than it seems to be on the surface. To be sure, the coupling of women and sports, at least in this country, is stronger than at any point in our history. When I was growing up in suburban Trenton, New Jersey, in the 1960s and ’70s, I had relatively limited opportunities to play organized sports. By contrast, there is a wide range of offerings available to today’s young girls, who can play sports freely at the grassroots level and then, thanks to Title IX, move on to established, wide-ranging and, in some cases, highly sophisticated programs in high school and college.

In the same way, I don’t recall my mother (or any of her friends) sweating it out side-by-side with the guys at the health club like I do; her recreational life didn’t extend much beyond her weekly bowling league. Who could have predicted in 1970 that only a generation later, adult women would be exercising in droves, and throwing themselves with vigor into athletic pursuits as far-flung (and rigorous) as triathlons, martial arts and Pilates?

Girls and women today have also taken to sports as fans in numbers that were unimaginable when Title IX became law in 1972. There was a time when you wouldn’t expect to see men and women cheering in unison at a sports venue, but sporting events in 2010 routinely feature a healthy share of passionate female spectators. And through the wonders of technology, girls and women — just like boys and men — now follow sports anyplace and anytime, with unprecedented ease.

But while women and sports seem closer than ever, elements of the relationship are sometimes hard to reconcile. In our post-Title IX world, the old stereotypes and barriers which historically distanced women and girls from sports are largely gone, but differences persist in the way American males and females participate in, consume and think about sports, which in turn affects health and fitness trends, media imagery and coverage, and strategies for companies trying to turn sports into profitable business ventures. The future of women’s sports will be shaped by the way these differences are addressed and by the effectiveness with which women’s sports proponents can meld the gains of the past 40 years with the needs, sensibilities and realities of today’s world.

A good place to start is with our girls. While it’s true that hordes of girls today participate avidly in sports in their formative years, extracurriculars and other diversions wind up competing for their attention, leaving many to drop out by the time they reach middle school or high school. Keeping our girls physically active as they move into adulthood emerges as a critical challenge.

And while it’s now perfectly normal for adult women to play or watch pretty much whatever sport suits their fancy, they may struggle to find enough hours in a day to fit sports in, as the demands in their lives (particularly for working mothers) often make sports of any kind a luxury, one more activity to shoehorn into an all-too busy day. Convincing women that sports are integral to a healthy and balanced life, and that making time for regular athletic activity shouldn’t be just a goal, but a priority, is an equally important imperative.

Evolving, and sometimes conflicting, definitions of femininity complicate matters. Most people are no longer put off by the sight of women sweating profusely or diving after loose balls, and an athletic, muscular build has begun to be accepted as a representation of feminine beauty. But representations of traditional gender roles persist: Bare-bellied cheerleaders endure as sideline fixtures at men’s sports competitions, and in sports (like football) where the machismo quotient is especially high, the opportunities for women who yearn to participate are still limited.

Time will tell whether the female athlete will ever replace the supermodel or actress as the prototype of femininity and beauty. Until that day comes, much good can come from promoting the notions that sweat has no gender; that strength is a form of beauty; and that health brought on by physical activity is an ideal to which all girls and women should aspire.

Women’s professional athletics are another important part of today’s equation. The progress since I was a girl has been real: women’s tennis and golf are now fixtures on the pro sports landscape, and after decades in the shadows, women’s basketball and soccer have found their way onto the scene, something many never dreamed possible.

But although the battles for acceptance which marked the 1970s and ’80s have been largely won, they’ve been replaced by another challenge: how to convert the feel-good vibe of “with you in spirit” into cold, hard revenue, so that women’s sports leagues can endure as viable businesses. The protections of Title IX, which helped make the pro outlets possible, do not reach beyond federally-funded educational institutions, so the future of the leagues will be wholly left to the realities of the marketplace. In the post-Title IX age, progress at the elite level will ride on the adeptness with which women’s sports leaders can marry what’s appealingly feminine with what’s impressively athletic, what’s edgy and controversial with what’s mainstream and wholesome — and in our culture of celebrity, whether women’s sports “products” can be turned into compelling entertainment, the kind that busy fans (women and girls among them) will make time for and pay real money to see.

Women and sports: their relationship is complicated. Part of the story has been told, but chapters remain to be written. For the believers, new frontiers beckon. It’s an exciting time.

Val Ackerman – ESPN